“Working with Clients Who Display Challenging Behaviour” Training for Support Workers

We are delighted to announce that – due to high demand – our “Working with Clients Who Display Challenging Behaviour” training for support workers will take place again on Tuesday 9th October 2018, 10.00am – 4.00pm at our office in Havant (for directions please click here). The training is designed to target the very specific and often challenging aspects of working with adults with acquired brain injury (ABI).

This one day course will improve support workers’ ability to:

  • Identify and address the emotional impact when working with clients who display challenging behaviours and determine ways of developing resilience;
  • Achieve and maintain rapport with clients following difficult episodes or disengagement;
  • Effectively interact, communicate and ‘debrief’ with clients with cognitive and communication difficulties; and
  • Ascertain new approaches to managing disinhibition, impulsivity and ‘risky’ behaviour.

The training is informed by a wide range of psychological models including:

  • Psycho-educational information regarding brain injury;
  • Neuro-anatomical models;
  • Listening skills/motivational interviewing;
  • Cognitive and behavioural models; and
  • Compassion focus & mindfulness approaches.

We received really positive feedback from support workers attending the course in June:

“I particularly enjoyed that the focus was on coping and managing our own behaviours surrounding clients’ behaviour and not the clients themselves.”

“I found it useful to talk about shared experiences. It’s always good to reflect back on your own practices.”

“I enjoyed looking at the case studies; putting theory into practice situations made it more relevant.”

“All aspects of the course were useful.”

Kate Blunden, Three Case Management, shares her experience of attending our support worker challenging behaviour training.

Refreshments
Morning and afternoon refreshments are included in the course fee.  Lunch is not included and delegates are responsible for their own arrangements (we are a 2 minute walk from Havant town centre).

Booking details
The cost for this 1 day training is £85.00 (plus VAT) per person. If you would like to book a member of your team onto this training, please call 02392 377 399 or email Chloe Nunan at  at chloe@psychologychartered.co.uk or Ellen Shaw at ellen@psychologychartered.co.uk to receive a booking form.

"Working with Clients Who Display Challenging Behaviour Training" Receives Positive Feedback

On Tuesday 12th June, Psychology Chartered delivered “Working with Clients Who Display Challenging Behaviour” training to 5 brain injury support workers from across the South and South East. The full day training - led by Dr Richard Maddicks (Consultant Clinical Neuropsychologist), Paul Walshe (Assistant Psychologist) and Elliot Miller (Assistant Psychologist) – focused on the meaning of challenging behaviour within the context of neurorehabilitation and improved support workers’ ability to:

  • Identify and address the emotional impact when working with clients who display challenging behaviours and determine ways of developing resilience
  • Achieve and maintain rapport with clients following difficult episodes or disengagement
  • Effectively interact, communicate and ‘debrief’ with clients with cognitive and communication difficulties
  • Ascertain new approaches to managing disinhibition, impulsivity and ‘risky’ behaviour

The training received really positive feedback from support workers attending the course:

“I particularly enjoyed that the focus was on coping and managing our own behaviours surrounding clients’ behaviour and not the clients themselves.”

“I found it useful to talk about shared experiences. It’s always good to reflect back on your own practices.”

“I enjoyed looking at the case studies; putting theory into practice situations made it more relevant.”

“All aspects of the course were useful.”

We are delighted to announce that – due to high demand - our challenging behaviour training will take place again on Tuesday 9th October 2018, 10.00am – 4.00pm at our Havant office (19 South Street, Havant, PO9 1BU). If you would like to book a member of your team onto this training, please email Chloe Nunan at chloe@psychologychartered.co.uk or Ellen Shaw at ellen@psychologychartered.co.uk to receive a booking form.

A Few Spaces Remaining on "Managing Challenging Behaviour" Training for Support Workers

On Tuesday 12th June Psychology Chartered will be running its well endorsed "Managing Clients Who Display Challenging Behaviour" training at our offices in Havant. This event is designed to empower support workers with strategies to positively intervene and influence the client's behaviour during episodes of resistance and low mood. 

http://www.psychologycharteredtraining.co.uk/news/2018/3/21/working-with-clients-who-display-challenging-behaviours-a-skills-based-training-day-for-the-support-worker

We only have a few places left. To book a member of your team onto this training today please email Paul at paul@psychologycharytered.co.uk who will provide you with a booking form.

Here is what some of the support workers who attended this training earlier this year had to say about this event:

"This was a very informative and enjoyable course and challenged how I view challenging behaviour"

"All aspects of the course are extremely relevant to my form of work"

"The opportunity to work in groups and share experiences I found really useful. The day was very interactive which I liked"

Writing Daily Observation Notes: Clinical Vs Narrative Information

Thursday 12th July 2018, 12.30-4pm at Psychology Chartered, 19 South Street, Havant, PO9 1BU

As a support worker are you

  • Sometimes having difficulty knowing what to write in your daily obs notes?
  • Unsure of what behaviours you need to be looking out for?
  • Feeling that you write too much narrative information?
  • Wanting to ensure your information is concise and clinically driven?

If you have answered yes to any of the above then we believe this training event, aimed at improving your ability to write informative daily observation notes, will be of interest to you.

Writing daily clinical observation notes can arguably feel like a tedious and labour intensive exercise however they play an integral part in providing insight for senior members of the client’s legal and therapeutic teams when making important decisions concerning welfare and current or future care packages. Additionally, data provided from observation notes also has the ability to provide detailed and concise feedback around the client’s progress with rehabilitation goals, enabling clinician’s to review therapeutic programmes much more accurately and cost effectively.

This 3.5 hour workshop will focus on

  • Ensuring staff know what senior clinicians look for in SW daily observation notes
  • Raising awareness of client behaviours and presentations which need to be observed for
  • Providing a guide of clinical terminology and phrases
  • Understanding the impetus on observation notes pre & post case settlement
  • Ensuring staff record how they have intervened to support their client

To book your place please contact Paul at paul@psychologycharytered.co.uk to request a booking form. Additionally should you want to find out more about this workshop please do not hesitate to contact Paul Walshe on 02392 377399. Price is £50pp + VAT.

Working with Clients who display Challenging Behaviours – A skills based training day for the Support Worker

Tuesday 12th June 2018 10am – 4pm
at
Psychology Chartered Office, 19 South Street, Havant, Hants, PO9 1BU
 

Due to growing demand, Psychology Chartered will be running another support worker training designed to target the very specific and often challenging aspects of working with adults with an acquired brain injury.  

This one day personal development course will improve the support worker’s ability to:-

  •  Identify and address the emotional impact on themselves when working with clients who display challenging behaviours
  •  Achieve and maintain rapport with clients following difficult episodes or disengagement
  •  Engage clients who are difficult to motivate (examples may include enabling a client to complete self-care tasks, undertake community based activities etc)
  •  Improve knowledge and skills regarding how to effectively interact, communicate and ‘debrief’ with clients with cognitive and communication difficulties

The training will be informed by a wide range of psychological models including

  • Psycho-educational information regarding brain injury
  • Neuro-anatomical models
  • Listening skills / motivational interviewing
  • Cognitive & Behavioural Models
  • Compassion focus & Mindfulness approaches

The training event is suitable for support workers of different levels of experience although some initial experience of work with this client group is likely to be of benefit. This particular event does not specifically address the management of physical aggression. Here is what delegates said who attended this event back in December;

"This was a very informative and enjoyable course and challenged how I view challenging behaviour"

"All aspects of the course are extremely relevant to my form of work"

"The opportunity to work in groups and share experiences I found really useful. The day was very interactive which I liked"

Refreshments
Tea, coffee and refreshments will be available from 9.30am on arrival with a view to start promptly at 10am. Lunch is not included in the training cost but can be easily purchased on the day as we are a 2 minute walk from the town centre of Havant.

Booking Details
The cost for this 1 days training is £85.00 ( Plus VAT) per person and a place can be booked by completing our booking form. To book your place please contact Paul Walshe on 02392 377399 or paul@psychologychartered.co.uk who will send out a booking form to you.

 

Supporting Clients at Expert Appointments: The Role Of The Support Worker

The task of accompanying clients to expert appointments often falls to case managers and support workers. These appointments serve an integral part of the litigation process and rely on the expert being presented with an accurate representation of your clients current progress which also addresses any challenges they may be experiencing. At Psychology Chartered we have over 20 years experience in providing expert appointments for clients with a suspected acquired brain injury (ABI) and therefore have a good understanding of what information the expert needs to be able to ascertain from these sessions.

These appointments can present a number of challenges for both the client and the professional supporting them. From the client's prospective, given most meetings take place in London, these appointments often represent long days and as a consequence can influence heightened feelings of anxiety and associated resistant behaviours. From the professional's perspective, given the level of insight of the client, you may have to challenge and disagree with your clients evaluation of progress and present a more accurate picture reflecting to the consensus of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). Consequently, there is a risk that the relationship between the client and professional may become strained which can have future negative implications not to mention a very difficult journey home. 

Having supported a number of clients attend these appointments, Psychology Chartered has put together a training event aimed at support workers responsible for taking clients to expert appointments. This session will look at addressing issues associated with:

  • Raising awareness of what is expected of the support worker during these appointments
  • Preparing the clients expectations of what they can expect of the support worker during the appointment and frame how they are there to support them
  • Strategies to enable thew support worker disagree with the clients evaluation which limit the likelihood of a loss of engagement and decrease in mood
  • Understanding what information the support worker needs to ensure is communicated to the expert
  • Techniques to repair and rebuild rapport should the client become disengaged 

This event will take place at our offices in Havant (19 South Street, Havant, PO9 1BU) on Thursday 14th June, 12.30pm - 4pm. Price for this training is £50 plus VAT. To register your interest and book your place please email Paul Walshe at paul@psychologychartered.co.uk today. 

Date of Next Team Leader Peer Support Event Announced

Having seen a growing increase in the popularity of these sessions, Psychology Chartered is pleased to announce the next Team Leader Peer Support Event will take place on Wednesday 9th May, 10am to 1pm at our offices in Havant (19 South Street, Havant, PO9 1BU).

This session will look at how we support our teams to provide sensitive feedback to our client when they have observed behaviours perceived as inappropriate or problematic. This can be challenging for support workers of all levels as quite often there is a high risk that the client may become irritated and we see a drastic decline in mood. Conversely, as a team leader I know it can sometimes be frustrating if we feel members of our teams are potentially avoiding such conversations which can have a detrimental affect on other members of the team. This session will provide some thoughtful example phrases you can take away and share with your teams.

The remainder of the session will be used flexibly to facilitate some Q&A for peers to share any issues they may be experiencing and a chance for fellow team leaders to share their experience. This model has received a lot of positive feedback in the past though I would like to stress you of course do not have to share anything should you choose not to.

If you are a team leader or senior support worker and feel this session would be of interest to you please contact me today at paul@psychologychartered.co.uk to book your FREE place today. We look forward welcoming you.

 

 

 

Waiting For News On My Clinical Psychology Doctorate Application: My Experience So Far!

By Ellen Shaw

It’s that time of year again, doctorate applications are in and we’re anxiously awaiting news. So I thought I’d take this opportunity share with you my experience of the doctorate application process….

I knew from the very beginning of my degree that a career in clinical psychology was going to be my chosen path, so I set out to make the very best of the syllabus at The University of Portsmouth in order to make myself the strongest candidate I could be. We all know that places on these courses are like gold dust!

In my first year I attended The BPS careers conference, this was an amazing day that cemented my ambition to pursue a clinical career, and it was there that I first met Dr Richard Maddicks. Knowing that I would have an option in my third year to undertake a work placement I took the opportunity to introduce myself to Dr Maddicks and ask him if I could approach him in the future about gaining work experience at his practice. During the second year of my degree I chose to take a research based unit which involved working as a research assistant as I knew that this would add some weight to my CV and another ‘string to my bow’. Here we are, I’m in my final year, during which I having been working at Psychology Chartered to gain some practical experience for my doctorate application.

 So what about the application? Being a mature student with a family to juggle, my decision about where to apply was made for me, Southampton is the closest place to offer the clinical doctorate. That being said, I still looked closely at the course specifications, and was very happy with what they offer. Before beginning the (mountainous) task of filling out the application I took the time to investigate what advice past applicants offer, with regards to desirable skills and experience as well as what to highlight in my application. I drafted out my personal statements and sought advice about what I had written (please note, the statements have a character limit not a word limit…. I found this out the hard way and had an emotional few days shaving my 10000 ‘character’ personal statement down to a mere 3000!). The deadline came, and after checking and rechecking my application I submitted it. So now is the waiting game, the application process is quite drawn out, so I have busied myself writing my dissertation (checking emails daily) while keeping everything crossed.

I was given some great advice by a lecturer: to not just focus on the end goal that is your chosen career, but to view your path through training as a journey, it is not always a direct route so enjoy the steps you take on the way to your destination. I truly believe in this, and if I cannot start on the path through my doctorate this year then I will take a small detour, gain some valuable experience as an assistant psychologist and reapply next year.

So my advice to those thinking of applying in the future…be prepared! Look ahead to the experiences you may be able to gain, and don’t be afraid to approach people for advice or the opportunity to gain experience. I wish you the very best of luck!

Is Your Care Team Having Difficulties Motivating A Client? We Can Help!

Many of our clients with acquired brain injuries will often present as having little motivation to complete what one may perceive as the simplest of daily tasks. Whether it's putting dirty washing in the wash basket, getting out of bed or leaving the house to engage in activities, how support staff choose to prompt clients can have a varying impact on whether a positive outcome is reached. From experience, I know that if a client perceives support staff to be too directive and believed to be "taking over" their life, often they can respond with some challenging behaviours and a dramatic change in mood. As a consequence both support workers and client can be left feeling frustrated.

At Psychology Chartered we want to empower teams with techniques and strategies to positively influence behaviour whilst also ensuring good engagement with the client. We understand the challenging situations health care professionals may experience and our 20 years experience in brain injury rehabilitation has made us well placed in being able to offer affordable expertise.

We offer a unique and tailored approach to our training model where we spend time getting to understand the needs of the support team pre-training event so we can ensure our content and strategies are as relevant as possible. Our feedback from case managers and support workers who have attended these sessions has always been very positive and a key point which is often feedback is teams really value from spending the whole sessions talking about only their client making "everything" relevant. We also pride ourselves on ensuring all our training events provide tangible strategies which support workers can easily apply on their very next shift. 

If you are a Solicitor, Case Manager, Team Leader or Health Care Professional working with a client with an ABI and feel your team would benefit from some clinical training designed to positively challenge a client's motivation, then we would like to hear from you. For a no obligation discussion to find out more about how we can assist please contact our Assistant Psychologist Paul Walshe at paul@psychologychartered.co.uk 

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Psychology Chartered And Novum Law's Support for Headway Swindon

Last week our Director Dr Richard Maddicks and Director of Novum Law Huw Ponting visited Swindon Headway to hand over a cheque for £1,150 from funds raised from delivering our Mental Capacity Event last year.

Richard and Huw were shown round by CEO Jane Weston and had the chance to see first hand some of the projects going on as well as meet some of its members and staff. Speaking afterwards, Richard said;

"It's great that we have the chance to support Headway who provide such a valuable service nationwide for individuals with acquired brain injuries. We sincerely hope our donation will go some way in sustaining a number of projects."  

Swindon Headway.JPG

ABI Challenging Behaviour Training Receives Glowing Feedback

Last week Psychology Chartered welcomed 12 support workers who specialise in brain injury rehabilitation to our offices in Havant to attend our "Working with clients who display challenging behaviour" training. The full day training, led by Clinical Neuropsychologist Dr Richard Maddicks, focused on how we as health care professionals view challenging behaviour and provided tangible strategies individuals could use on their very next shift to positively influence behaviour. The course covers a wide range of behaviours including dealing with constant negativity, low motivation, unpredictable mood changes, sexually inappropriate behaviour and impulsivity. 

At Psychology Chartered we feel passionately that any delegate on one of our training events needs to be able to leave with new techniques and strategies they can apply. On this course we introduced a number of motivational interviewing techniques to empower staff to be more thoughtful in their communication and try different ways of prompting clients.

The feedback was really positive and due to high demand we are pleased to announce we will be running this course again on Thursday 3rd May, 10-4pm at our offices (19 South Street, Havant, PO9 1BU). To book your place today and to find out more about how this course may benefit you please email me at  paul@psychologychartered.co.uk 

Here are a few testimonials from some of the support workers who attended last week;

"This was a very informative and enjoyable course and challenged how I view challenging behaviour"

"All aspects of the course are extremely relevant to my form of work"

"The opportunity to work in groups and share experiences I found really useful. The day was very interactive which I liked"

Latest Team Leader Peer Support Event Receiving Excellent Feedback

Last week Psychology Chartered hosted its 3rd free Team Leader Peer Support event at our offices in Havant. Our Assistant Psychologist and fellow Team Leader Paul Walshe led the session which consisted of a  semi structured design with him delivering a presentation on how an awareness of Psychology Contract Theory can help develop the relationship between Team Leader and Support Worker. The second half of the session was allocated for peers to share any issues and ask questions around best practice they may have. 

Speaking after the event Paul said;

"It's really pleasing to see more new faces turning up to these events and for Team Leaders to have the opportunity to meet their fellow peers. This role can be quite isolating at times so the chance to share experiences and even seek reassurances is invaluable and the feedback I am receiving is only reinforcing my thoughts on this. It is also important to say that these sessions are not intended to be an opportunity for Team Leaders to turn up and simply vent and off load frustration. Whilst there is scope to communicate some of the more challenging aspects of the role, the impetus always remains to adopt a positive approach and to facilitate collaboration to generate a solution focused mindset. I am aware that probably sounds cheesier than a bog of Wotsits, but is honestly the kind of environment and culture I want to promote."

The date and details for the next Team Leader event is yet to be confirmed but is likely to be set for end of February, early March 2018. Do please keep an eye across our social media platforms and blogs for further information. If you are a Team Leader or Senior Support Worker and would like to find out more about these sessions then please do get in touch with Paul who will be more than happy to assist. He can be contacted at paul@psychologychartered.co.uk

 

 

 

Brain Injury Support: Strategies to Improve a Clients Mood

Recently I was on shift supporting my client to think about his choices for dinner that evening when suddenly I witnessed a drastic change in his mood. “You tell me Paul, what would you like me to have for dinner?” was the response I received to my question of “so what are your thoughts for dinner tonight then Eliot? Eliot then slammed a kitchen cupboard door and stormed off to his bedroom. Whilst I have witnessed similar challenging episodes of behaviour in the past, I was surprised at the drastic change in Eliot’s mood given I had perceived us to be engaged in positive and jovial rapport seconds before.

I am sure many Case Managers, Team Leaders and Support Workers could all relate to this scenario in some capacity. I believe that it’s situations like these where we need to use all our skills and experience to repair the relationship which has momentarily broken down for reasons we may be unclear of at that particular time. If we can slowly begin to rebuild rapport with the client we can use this to start to improve their mood. Here are 3 tips I would suggest for doing this should you ever find yourself in a similar situation to me.

1. Give the client space

In the first instance it’s important to give the client space to calm down and trying to initiate conversation at this time is only likely to fuel their hostility. You can also use this time to self-reflect to try and identify possible triggers for your clients drop in mood. Consider your tone and ask yourself whether your communication was too direct thus running the risk of the client perceiving you to be “controlling”. It is also likely that your client got a text from a family member/partner/peer/case manager which annoyed them and unfortunately for you, you’re the nearest person they could vent at.

2. Get a quick victory

In this instance a quick victory refers to observing a smile, smirk, laugh (this is the ultimate quick victory) or even a Funny look on the face of your client. These social cues should serve as the building blocks to re-establishing rapport and repairing the relationship. To attempt to bring about these social cues you need to know your client. Know what appeals to their sense of humour and personality and then be creative. Sharing funny YouTube clips, repeating funny lines from films I know my client likes (Your my boy blue”, Anchorman) and suggesting to watch an episode of a Eastenders have all in the past enabled me to get a quick victory and improve a client’s mood.

3. Apologise

If after some investigation you realise your behaviour was partly to blame for your clients drop in mood then you need to apologise. Acknowledge that it was never your intention to upset and/or frustrate them and that you’re sorry you have been perceived that way. Only once the client has had time to calm down and you’ve had a chance to get a couple of quick victories are they likely to be receptive to your apology. From here you should be able to draw a line under what’s happened and move on and begin to see noticeable improvement in your clients mood.

If you would like to find out more around strategies and techniques to improve your clients mood during periods of difficult engagement please email me today at paul@psychologychartered.co.uk

From Research-Led To Research-Based Learning: Including Students As Partners In Research

By Ellen Shaw

This week the university of Bournemouth held a conference bringing together experts in higher education research and teaching policy, to share their insights into the importance of the connections between education and research. This included case studies from universities who are already successfully connecting the two.      

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In my experience during my undergraduate studies this is something that the psychology department at The University of Portsmouth do exceptionally well. There are numerous opportunities for us to work collaboratively with lecturers, gaining fantastic skills to take forward into our careers. Therefore, I was asked (along with two other students) to accompany Dr Mark Turner from the university, to share the ways the department include students as partners in research.

My experience came in the second year of my degree when I applied for a position as a research assistant as part of an Employability skills unit. After being successful at interview I was responsible for completing an ethics proposal, compiling an online questionnaire and undertaking a literature search – all fantastic skills for my future studies and career.

To stand up in a lecture theatre and talk in front of a large group of people was daunting, however I gained a lot from the day. Listening to other case studies and comparing them to Dr Turner’s fantastic overview of our psychology department, made me realised that the experience and skills I am gaining at the Portsmouth university are of a very high standard – something I’ll be sure to highlight in my Doctorate application!

Next Team Leader Peer Support Event Announced

Following on from the positive response we have received from our two previous Team Leader Peer Support events Psychology Chartered is pleased to announce we will be running one more before the end of 2017.

On Tuesday 5th December, 10-1pm at our offices in Havant (19 South Street, Havant, Hampshire, PO9 1BU) we would like to invite Team Leaders and Senior Support workers working with clients with an acquired brain injury to join us for what will be an informative and enjoyable peer development opportunity. This session will look at psychological theory around understanding and developing our relationships with team members to ensure high level performance as well as looking at strategies and behaviours to promote positive relationships with family members. There will also be ample opportunity to meet other peers and to share current challenges you might be facing in a friendly and confidential environment.

This session is completely FREE to attend although places are first come first served. To register you're interest today and find out more please email Paul Walshe at  paul@psychologychartered.co.uk

 

Namophobia: How Anxious Do You Feel When Separated From Your Mobile Phone?

Mobile phones. Many of us have them; many of us ‘can’t live without them’. But is there really such a thing as “Nomophobia?" (no mobile phobia). Is it possible to suffer from phone separation anxiety? In an article published in the Guardian recently, researchers argue that it is possible to suffer with anxiety when separated from your mobile phone.

A study in Hong Kong found that feelings of anxiety and unpleasantness can occur for some people when they are separated from their mobiles, possibly due to the users feeling that their device is an extension of themselves. This is particularly true for people who use their phones to store, share and access personal memories.

Further research conducted in America indeed showed that when users of a smartphone were separated from their device, they showed an increase in both their heart rate and blood pressure. Mark Griffiths, a Chartered Psychologist at Nottingham Trent University, suggests that this separation anxiety is perhaps due to a fear of not being socially connected (particularly for teenagers).

So, what can we do to ensure that we don’t develop a dependence on our phones? Griffiths suggests that few people fulfil the criteria for mobile phone addiction, however switching it off or leaving it at home once in a while can reduce anxiety and dependency.

For more information and to read thew full article please click the link below.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/28/does-phone-separation-anxiety-really-exist

Support Worker Training : Working With Clients Who Display Challenging Behaviours

Working with Clients who display Challenging Behaviours – A skills based training day for the Support Worker

Tuesday 23rd January 23rd January 2018 10am – 4pm
at
Psychology Chartered Office, 19 South Street, Havant, Hants, PO9 1BU
 

Psychology Chartered are introducing support worker training designed to target the very specific and often challenging aspects of working with adults with an acquired brain injury.  

This one day personal development course will improve the support worker’s ability to:-

Ø  Identify and address the emotional impact on themselves when working with clients who display challenging behaviours

 Ø  Achieve and maintain rapport with clients following difficult episodes or disengagement

 Ø  Engage clients who are difficult to motivate (examples may include enabling a client to complete self-care tasks, undertake community based activities etc)

 Ø  Improve knowledge and skills regarding how to effectively interact, communicate and ‘debrief’ with clients with cognitive and communication difficulties

The training will be informed by a wide range of psychological models including

Ø  Psycho-educational information regarding brain injury

Ø  Neuro-anatomical models

Ø  Listening skills / motivational interviewing

Ø  Cognitive & Behavioural Models

Ø  Compassion focus & Mindfulness approaches

The training event is suitable for support workers of different levels of experience although some initial experience of work with this client group is likely to be of benefit. This particular event does not specifically address the management of physical aggression.  This will be addressed in other Psychology Chartered training events.

Refreshments
Tea, coffee and refreshments will be available from 9.30am on arrival with a view to start promptly at 10am. Lunch is not included in the training cost but can be easily purchased on the day as we are a 2 minute walk from the town centre of Havant.

Booking Details
The cost for this 1 days training is £85.00 (Including VAT) per person and a place can be booked by completing our booking form. An invoice will then be raised and sent to you. Payment must be received by Psychology Chartered by Tuesday 16th January. Cancellations made with less than 1 weeks’ notice may still be charged in full. To book your place please contact Paul Walshe on 02392 377399 or paul@psychologychartered.co.uk who will send out a booking form to you.

The Art of Prompting

If you have worked as a support worker for an individual with an acquired brain injury (ABI) you will be aware how difficult it can sometimes be to motivate and encourage engagement with a number of activities. Often it is the subtle differences in how we word things, our tone and how we choose to respond which can play a key role in positively influencing the client’s behaviour.

Here are 3 key tips to consider if you are experiencing constant resistance from your client when prompting them to engage in an activity of daily living or a more sociable event.

1.        Are you allowing yourself to be perceived as controlling and /or dictating?

Be careful that your prompting is not too direct which is likely to cause friction with the client possibly thinking you are trying to dictate to them. Try to keep your communication at the adult-adult level, for example “Can I make a suggestion? how would you feel about going to the cinema after your physio appointment?” as opposed to “if you go to physio we could then maybe go the cinema afterwards?”
 

2.       Was the timing considered?

Before trying to actively encourage your client to engage in a particular activity consider the following;

  •  How is your client presenting? (Good mood?, fatigued?, engaging?)
  • Does your client have anything planned that day which may impede the likelihood of them wanting to or being able to engage in this activity?
  • Is there the potential for conflict/disagreement? (do you have available all the information you need?
  • Is your client currently engrossed in some other activity?

Whilst I accept that there can be instances where regardless of it perhaps not being the best time you need to be quite directive in your approach with the client. Encouraging them to attend important medical appointments is often a good example of this. However I would envisage that these appointments in most (but not all) cases are confirmed some time in advance and then strategies can be put in place to give the team every chance of prompting the client to attend. Of course the reality is that of our clients are assessed to have capacity; we cannot force them to attend anything, in which case all we can so is educate them on the consequences of noncompliance. In all other cases I would remind staff to not place undue pressure on themselves to get things done and instead encourage them to work to your clients pace. Maybe wait that little longer for them to watch Jeremy Kyle or play GTA before starting to think about their plans. 
 

3.       No when to “leave it”

Sometimes there will be occasions where, for a number of reasons, your client will be unwilling to being encouraged to engage in a given activity. From my experience these episodes are not too common but it’s important to recognise them as often continuing to prompt will only further worsen their mood and impact negatively on your relationship for a time. In these situations abandon any immediate attempts to try and encourage them to do anything and instead be led by them. Focus purely on maintaining good relations and keeping their mood high. Once this has been achieved for a substantial period of time, sensitively attempt to revisit motivating them to engage in a certain activity. Indirect prompts are very much you’re friend at this point. “so what are your thoughts on that new Tom Cruise film?, looks pretty funny" maybe a more gentle way of introducing the idea of going to the cinema.

If you are interested in learning more around how to improve your ability to motivate clients with an ABI or indeed wish to be able to better manage resistance when trying to prompt a client to engage then please contact us at Psychology Chartered. Our team of expert Clinical Neuropsychologists, have over 20 years’ experience in brain injury rehabilitation and specialise in designing strategies to empower support staff to positively influence a client’s behaviour.

To find out how we can support you and your teams please email paul@psychologychartered.co.uk today.

 

 

 

 

Making Headway with Support for Brain Injury Survivors: Prince Harry Launches New Identity Cards

By Elliot Miller

Headway and his Royal Highness Prince Harry have launched a new Brain Injury Identity Card, to help support people with brain injuries. The hidden effects of brain injury can often lead to misunderstandings and difficulties for survivors. Dominic Hurley suffered a brain injury when he fell off a moped while on holiday in Cyprus in 1994. The 44-year-old is regularly mistaken for being drunk due to his unsteady gait and slurred speech – which has led to him getting arrested three times. He said his treatment made him feel like a “common criminal”.

The ID card - developed as part of Headway’s Justice Project - aims to raise police officers’ awareness of brain injury, improve brain injury identification and ensure survivors receive appropriate support throughout the criminal justice system; helping all those in a similar situation to Hurley. Prince Harry has called the card a “saving grace” for both survivors and police officers. The scheme has received support from a number of police forces, including the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), Police Scotland and the Police Service of Northern Ireland.

The cards – featuring the individual’s photo and some of the effects they commonly experience – also hopes to break down social exclusion by giving holders increased confidence in the knowledge they can easily explain the effects of their brain injury in everyday social situations. Mr Hurley now carries an ID card and says it is a “better way” of telling people the effects of his brain injury.

The Headway Brain Injury Identity Card is free and available to anyone aged 18 and over who has a verifiable brain injury. The card also includes a 24-hour criminal legal helpline managed by a firm of solicitors trained in understanding brain injury, enabling people to access specialist legal support should they find themselves in a difficult situation.

For more information and details of how to apply for a Headway Brain Injury Identity Card visit www.headway.org.uk/supporting-you/brain-injury-indentity-card/.